Raspberry PI used to hack NASA Secrets

Engadget reporting:

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) suffers from multiple cybersecurity weaknesses despite the advances it has achieved in space technology, according to the agency’s Office of Inspector General (PDF). Investigators looked into the research center’s network security controls after an April 2018 security breach, wherein a Raspberry Pi that was not authorized to be linked to the JPL network was targeted by hackers. The attackers were able to steal 500 megabytes of data from one of its major mission systems, and they also used that chance to find a gateway that allowed them to go deeper into JPL’s network.

Probably happens all the time.

All The Things Game of Thrones Left Hanging in the Air

The Verge has the full list:

A few of my favorites:

Where did the Dothraki go?

Unclear. There’s a clear shot of some Dothraki just chilling by the docks in King’s Landing while Jon makes his sad walk to his boat, but while there’s some clear information about why the Unsullied didn’t riot, kill Jon Snow, and take the city themselves, the same courtesy isn’t given the Dothraki, who were apparently pretty chill about their queen being murdered.

Given that they only came to Westeros to serve Dany and help her kill the men in metal suits and break their stone houses, it’s not clear what they have to do now, especially with their Khaleesi dead. Still, for a Dothraki fighter, the whole Westeros trip was probably a pretty successful vacation, given those goals.

What about the Unsullied?

While Tyrion does offer them land in the Reach and the chance to become a house of Westeros, we see Grey Worm captaining a ship of Unsullied later in the episode, alongside a fleet of similarly black-sailed ships. It’s not entirely clear whether the entire band of Unsullied is joining Grey Worm as he sails to Naath, presumably to liberate Missandei’s people. But it does seem likely that they’re going collectively.

It seems that with or without Daenerys to lead them, the Unsullied will continue to fight to liberate people — a fitting ending for the freed slaves.

Why does the North just get to stay independent?

It’s a little strange that Sansa casually breaks the North away from the rest of the Seven (now Six) Kingdoms in accordance with the North’s well-established independent streak, and the lords of the Vale, the Riverlands, Casterly Rock, Storm’s End, the Reach, and Dorne don’t have the faintest word to say about their own status.

Honestly, there’s no real reason why the North should get its independence — especially since, say, Dorne is a far more independent kingdom, which joined the Seven Kingdoms two centuries after Aegon conquered the others. Dorne has historically been far more independently minded than the North, even though the North’s rebellion against the Iron Throne got a lot more air time on the show.

What’s Daario up to?

Daario Naharis was part of the Mereen subplot on the show. He eventually led the Second Sons, a mercenary company, and was one of Daenerys’ paramours, as well as part of her inner circle when she led the city. But when Daenerys leaves for Westeros at the end of the sixth season, she leaves Daario behind in Meereen alongside the Second Sons, and we haven’t seen him since.

Given his importance to Daenerys and the large military force he commands, it’s possible that the show could have brought him back for the war against Cersei, but it seems like Daario is still stuck in Mereen.

A Retro Adventure Game Creator for Your Favorite Handheld Video Game System

John Gruber via Daring Fireball:

GB Studio is “A free and easy to use retro adventure game creator for your favourite handheld video game system”, by which they mean, but don’t want to name specifically, Nintendo’s GameBoy.

What a fun idea from developer Chris Maltby. You can output ROMs for emulators, play them on actual GameBoy hardware with a flash cartridge, or even export them for the web (which will even work on phones). It’s a remarkably polished IDE.

Get it here.

What is SoftBank, and who is behind the Silicon Valley’s largest VC fund?

Recode:

SoftBank is a Tokyo-based company founded almost four decades ago by Masayoshi Son at the age of 24. What started as a store for computer parts has become one of Japan’s most important public companies, valued at over $115 billion. It now is essentially a tech, media, and telecom conglomerate — it owns more than 80 percent of Sprint, more than one-quarter of Alibaba, and 100 percent of the robotics company Boston Dynamics, whose nightmare-inducing animatronics might be familiar to you.

But SoftBank in recent years has been transitioning from a Verizon or AT&T of Japan to something like more of a Blackstone of the world, intentionally moving from a telecom-based giant to a global investing vehicle — thanks, largely, to the Vision Fund.

To understand SoftBank is to understand Son, an eccentric, Star Wars-quoting, diminutive man who is known in the world of high finance solely as “Masa.” To his fans, Son is a daring savant, whose early investment in Alibaba has become part of venture capital lore and at one point made him one of the richest men in the world. To his detractors, Son is an arrogant fool who got lucky once but has since run roughshod over a venture capital system that was already working.

Scary & interesting read.

Uber Stock is a Disaster

Gizmodo reporting:

According to one analyst, the company may be profitable by 2024, though its only real plan so far is to continue to screw workers and eventually replace them with unproven technology. As former CEO Travis Kalanick said in 2014, “the reason that Uber could be expensive is you’re not just paying for the car, you’re paying for the other dude in the car who’s driving.”

Presently, investors are probably realizing that what they’re paying for is an unsustainable company so huge that its main justification for existing is sunk cost.

Ouch.

Facebook Deleted Mark Zuckerberg Early Posts

Business Insider:

Old Facebook posts by Mark Zuckerberg have disappeared — obscuring details about core moments in Facebook’s history.

On multiple occassions, years-old public posts made by the 34-year-old billionaire chief executive that were previously public and reported on by news outlets at the time have since vanished, Business Insider has found. That includes all of the posts he made during 2007 and 2008.

Reached for comment, a Facebook spokesperson said the posts were “mistakenly deleted” due to “technical errors.”

Right. Mistake.

Categories NewsCategories

Facebook Saved Passwords in Regular Text File

Ars Technica:

Brian Krebs reports that hundreds of millions of Facebook users had their credentials logged in plain text by various applications written by Facebook employees. Those credentials were searched by about 2,000 Facebook engineers and developers more than 9 million times, according to a senior Facebook employee who spoke to Krebs; the employee asked to remain anonymous because they did not have permission to speak to the press on the matter.

In a blog post today, Facebook Vice President of Engineering, Security, and Privacy Pedro Canahuati wrote that the unencrypted passwords were found during “a routine security review in January” on Facebook’s internal network data storage. “This caught our attention because our login systems are designed to mask passwords using techniques that make them unreadable. We have fixed these issues and, as a precaution, we will be notifying everyone whose passwords we have found were stored in this way.”

Not surprised.

Eggs Are Bad For You, Again

Gizmodo:

Ultimately, they found there was a 17 percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease associated with every extra 300 milligrams of dietary cholesterol a day, along with an 18 percent increased risk of early death, even after adjusting for factors like the amount of calories eaten per day. And each extra half-egg a day was similarly linked to a 6 percent and 8 percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease and early death, respectively.

The link between egg consumption and poorer health went away after accounting for a person’s cholesterol intake, suggesting their high cholesterol content was the principle reason behind the increased risk.

F***

Facebook Announces Leadership Changes

The Verge:

Here’s the breakdown of the executive changes:

Chris Cox will depart Facebook, but hasn’t revealed plans for what’s next.

Chris Daniels will leave WhatsApp, and Facebook declined to provide any details on why or the circumstances.

Will Cathcart will go from running the main Facebook app to VP of WhatsApp

Fidji Simo who was the VP of Product for Facebook video, news, and advertising will take over Cathcart’s role running Facebook’s main app

Javier Olivan who was Facebook’s VP of growth will lead the task of identifying how to integrate Facebook’s products, including the plan to unify the backend of Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram direct to expand encryption and allow cross-app messaging that some see a shield against Facebook being broken up.

Instagram VP Adam Mosseri, Messenger’s VP Stan Chudnovsky, Simo, and Cathcart will now report directly to Zuckerberg, while Chief Marketing Officer Antonio Lucio reports to COO Sheryl Sandberg

How to install the Android Q beta

The Verge:

If you’re not the kind of person who wants to unlock your phone’s bootloader, I can’t blame you. Google lets Pixel owners enroll in the beta by simply logging in with a Google account, then selecting the compatible device that they’d like to install the beta. You’ll get an over-the-air update that way, just like you normally would for stable versions of Android.

Once you click “Enroll,” you’ll eventually get an update notification on the enrolled device that a system update is ready. You may need to check for a system update in order for it to fetch the beta software, but it usually doesn’t take long for it to be ready for download. (Google says it could take 24 hours or more, but we’ve rarely had to wait that long. The beta hit one of our phones less than a half-hour after enrolling it.) As new Android Q developer previews come out, you’ll get a notification to install them, too, as you would for any regular system update.

Alternatively, you can flash the Android Q beta to your Pixel phone. Google has provided a list of image downloads for the supported phones, but you should only take this road if you’re a developer, or if you just like to do things the hard way. Phones that are updated in this manner won’t receive over-the-air updates to upcoming beta versions, so if you want the latest Android Q features without much hassle, just enroll in the beta instead.

Boeing’s Proposed Solution to Max 8’s MCAS System

The Wired reporting:

The solution, then, is twofold: Boeing started by warning airlines that the MAX’s angle of attack sensors had malfunctioned before, that such a failure could lead the MCAS (Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System) to push the plane’s nose down, and that pilots could safely defuse the problem by cutting off the trim system and working the plane manually.

After making sure pilots knew about the problem and how to resolve it, Boeing would work on a longterm solution. Essentially, it would rejigger the software governing MCAS so that it wouldn’t be as prone to jumping into action based on one scary sensor reading, instead considering more data. And it would limit how many times it can engage.

Boeing said it would have it done within a few months. Then the Ethiopian Airlines jet crashed. We don’t yet know if the jet’s MCAS system is what brought the plane down, or what other factors may have been at work. We do know that what seemed a straightforward fix to an unforeseen problem is now muddied—and that the 737 MAX won’t take off again until it’s been cleared up.

Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System sounds like a software hack…